This year was the first time I put Okra in my garden. So far it’s been a great success.
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I thought I’d post a very short blog to show you some photos. The okra, as I said in an earlier post is related to the Hibiscus. You can really see that when you look at the blossoms. Here’s a shot of one from my garden today.

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The photo to the left shows the okra growing nice and tall.  That to me says I will be able to try this again next year and plan my garden so I put plants that are low to the ground at the base of the okra – giving me more bang for the buck in my tiny garden.

Finally, I have started harvesting the okra pods every day so that they don’t quickly turn baseball bat-sized and almost woody. I’m using my mom’s technique of cutting them upokra3, dredging them in corn meal and flash freezing them on a cookie sheet.  Once frozen, I’m adding them to my growing bag of ready-to-fry okra pieces.  Can’t wait to fry up a batch.  This is turning out to be a good technique for using the few pieces that ripen each day.

So, gardeners and cooks.  If you don’t already grow Okra give it a try.  It’s a friendly-to-gardeners plant that loves heat.  My stepfather used to say “when the tomatoes start dying, the okra starts producing.”  In our area, that means I can add it to my garden smack dab in the middle of the hot summer and enjoy it up until fall.  In today’s economy any way I can stretch a dollar by growing my own vegetables, I’ll do it.

Ciao y’all.

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